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What is a Trust?



When you hear the words “trust" or “trust fund," the first image that may come to mind is a wealthy family in a mansion with inherited wealth passed down from generation to generation.

If asked what a trust or trust fund is, many people would probably be hard pressed to offer up an accurate definition.

However, there is nothing particularly mysterious or overly difficult to understand about a trust or a trust fund, nor do you have to be a member of the Rockefeller clan or the Gates family, to set up and benefit from a trust.

A trust is a legal vehicle that greatly expands your options when it comes to managing your assets, whether you’re trying to shield your wealth from taxes or pass it on to your children. “A trust," according to Fidelity Investments, “is a fiduciary arrangement that allows a third party, or trustee, to hold assets on behalf of a beneficiary or beneficiaries."

A trust is a fiduciary arrangement that allows a third party, or trustee, to hold assets on behalf of a beneficiary or beneficiaries. Trusts can be arranged in many ways and can specify exactly how and when the assets pass to the beneficiaries.

Since trusts usually avoid probate, your beneficiaries may gain access to these assets more quickly than they might to assets that are transferred using a will. Additionally, if it is an irrevocable trust, it may not be considered part of the taxable estate, so fewer taxes may be due upon your death.

Assets in a trust may also be able to pass outside of probate, saving time, court fees, and potentially reducing estate taxes as well.

  Other benefits of trusts include:
  • Control of your wealth.You can specify the terms of a trust precisely, controlling when and to whom distributions may be made. You may also, for example, set up a revocable trust so that the trust assets remain accessible to you during your lifetime while designating to whom the remaining assets will pass thereafter, even when there are complex situations such as children from more than one marriage.

  • Protection of your legacy.A properly constructed trust can help protect your estate from your heirs' creditors or from beneficiaries who may not be adept at money management.

  • Privacy and probate savings.Probate is a matter of public record; a trust may allow assets to pass outside of probate and remain private, in addition to possibly reducing the amount lost to court fees and taxes in the process.

Basic types of trusts explained

Marital or "A" trust Designed to provide benefits to a surviving spouse; generally included in the taxable estate of the surviving spouse

Bypass or "B" trust Also known as credit shelter trust, established to bypass the surviving spouse's estate in order to make full use of any federal estate tax exemption for each spouse

Testamentary trust Outlined in a will and created through the will after the death, with funds subject to probate and transfer taxes; often continues to be subject to probate court supervision thereafter

Irrevocable life insurance trust (ILIT) Irrevocable trust designed to exclude life insurance proceeds from the deceased’s taxable estate while providing liquidity to the estate and/or the trusts' beneficiaries

Charitable lead trust Allows certain benefits to go to a charity and the remainder to your beneficiaries

Generation-skipping trust Using the generation-skipping tax exemption, permits trust assets to be distributed to grandchildren or later generations without incurring either a generation-skipping tax or estate taxes on the subsequent death of your children

Qualified Terminable Interest Property (QTIP) trust Used to provide income for a surviving spouse. Upon the spouse’s death, the assets then go to additional beneficiaries named by the deceased. Often used in second marriage situations, as well as to maximize estate and generation-skipping tax or estate tax planning flexibility

Grantor Retained Annuity Trust (GRAT) Irrevocable trust funded by gifts by its grantor; designed to shift future appreciation on quickly appreciating assets to the next generation during the grantor's lifetime

Revocable vs. irrevocable


There are many types of trusts; a major distinction between them is whether they are revocable or irrevocable.

  Revocable trust: Also known as a living trust, a revocable trust can help assets pass outside of probate, yet allows you to retain control of the assets during your (the grantor's) lifetime. It is flexible and can be dissolved at any time, should your circumstances or intentions change. A revocable trust typically becomes irrevocable upon the death of the grantor.

You can name yourself trustee (or co-trustee) and retain ownership and control over the trust, its terms and assets during your lifetime, but make provisions for a successor trustee to manage them in the event of your incapaCitrus Heights or death.

Although a revocable trust may help avoid probate, it is usually still subject to estate taxes. It also means that during your lifetime, it is treated like any other asset you own.

  Irrevocable trust: An irrevocable trust typically transfers your assets out of your (the grantor's) estate and potentially out of the reach of estate taxes and probate, but cannot be altered by the grantor after it has been executed. Therefore, once you establish the trust, you will lose control over the assets and you cannot change any terms or decide to dissolve the trust.

An irrevocable trust is generally preferred over a revocable trust if your primary aim is to reduce the amount subject to estate taxes by effectively removing the trust assets from your estate. Also, since the assets have been transferred to the trust, you are relieved of the tax liability on the income generated by the trust assets (although distributions will typically have income tax consequences). It may also be protected in the event of a legal judgment against you.
 

Deciding on a trust


State laws vary significantly in the area of trusts and should be considered before making any decisions about a trust. Consult your attorney for details.

Disclaimer: This article is intended to provide general information. The content of this publication is for informational purposes only. Neither this publication nor its author is rendering legal or other professional advice or opinions on specific facts or matters. No attorney-client relationship is created by this advisory, nor by any response to the information herein, unless and until a conflicts review has been conducted by Steven F. Bliss, and a written agreement containing all terms of representation has been signed.  

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